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Archive for agosto \28\-03:00 2008

“Who are these people, how do we want their stories to end, what is it really about? Once we did that, it all broke free. And then it was, “OK, this is what the finale is about.” And the plot was simple, the finale has a fairly simple through-line to it. But it’s really not about that. It’s really about these people you’ve taken this journey with and what the end of their stories are going to be.

So then I went off and wrote it. I didn’t write an outline this time. I had the basic cards in some sort of grouping and I went home with that. I pitched the network and the studio on the story and they loved it. I started to write it, and I wrote it sort of very organically. I’d write a scene, write what the next scene should probably be, then the next scene, the next scene. I just kept doing that and never went back. Just wrote it in one pass.

I finished my rough draft on a Friday and it was at 130 pages. I spent Saturday cutting 20 pages out and I turned it in Sunday and just waited to see what the reactions were. I went up to Vancouver and I started getting feedback kind of quickly – everyone wants to read the finale.

I was very not emotionally engaged with it, truth to tell. It was [a case of,] “I just have to write this,” and I was having to balance “Caprica” and “Virtuality” and getting really annoyed when everybody was interrupting me. I was just like, “Leave me alone, I’ve got to write this.”

Then I started hearing the actors were saying, “I was on the plane and I was crying and the guy next to me didn’t know what was wrong with me.” People were having these emotional responses, it was like, everybody was having this intense emotional reaction to it. And was just like, “Oh geez. Well, this is good.” But it still wasn’t hitting me.

It hit me when I was sitting in the pre-production meeting for the finale with all the department heads. The first assistant director goes through the script, you’re going through each scene, [and for example, he says,] “OK, we’re in CIC and Adama is there and Tigh is there and we need a stunt player.” It’s very businesslike, talking about how we’re going to make this. It’s essentially walking you through the script to see what it’s about.

And I’m sitting there, and we got to the end, and he started going through the last 10 pages, and I started to cry [Moore got choked up at this point, and his eyes got misty.] I was sitting there and it was… it was very…. it was hard. It was really the end.”

——

Gênio.

Fonte: Chicago Tribune.

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